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Track 5.2 - Innovation Models in Emerging Countries

Cyrine TANGOUR, Pharm.D, Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy - IMW
Luise FISCHER, Dr., Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy - IMW
Nizar ABDELKAFI, Dr. habil., Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy - IMW


Track's Contacts :
cyrine.tangour[at]imw.fraunhofer.de
luise.fischer[at]imw.fraunhofer.de
nizar.abdelkafi[at]imw.fraunhofer.de


In emerging countries, there is a large disconnect between research and practice. Research results are rarely exploited to address the needs of society. At the same time, research-based innovation in emerging markets should constitute an important, mechanism to evolve national economies and serve global markets. We therefore suggest that the management of innovation is a focal point for better understanding the factors that hinder and foster transfer of scientific knowledge into innovation both on the level of individual organisations, and countries in general.

The known models of R&D and innovation have had limited success in emerging economies. Science, Technology and Innovation studies have mostly targeted different levels of analysis such as national, sectoral, and technological levels. Yet, the governance of the various STI systems in emerging economies has been rather less the subject of such studies. In addition, there is evidence showing that innovation in emerging economies often originate in innovative business models and rather less in the form of products or service innovation.

Consequently, we suggest studying the characteristics, role and potentials of innovation models in emerging economies. More particularly, the track would welcome papers that propose new models of innovation for emerging countries, examine the role of different innovation models in boosting economic development, the role of education, and the scientific transfer mechanism. In addition, the interdependencies between innovation, be it product, service, or business model innovation, and the formation and evolution of networks can provide insights to better understand and advance the current role of innovation in emerging economies. We would like to invite contributions that inquire the following areas:

(1) What makes innovation differ in emerging economies? How are different emerging markets adopting or giving rise to new R&D and innovation models? What lessons can be shared with industrialised countries?
(2) What kind of education for innovation contribute to develop those markets? What role should universities and academic research play in order to bridge the areas of research, industry and society?
(3) What new forms of R&D management practices and/or transfer mechanisms are needed to help researchers apply their knowledge to real-life situations and to support them enter into commercialisation agreements for their findings?
(4) How can complex decisions be managed at the organisation level? How can innovation practices at the organisation level influence the innovativeness of the affiliated supply chain networks in the context of emerging economies? What role do business models play in order to achieve supply chain networks innovation?